How We Use All American History

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How We Use All American History from Bright Ideas Press

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One thing I love about All American History is that each week is centered around just one lesson. Lesson planning is simplified, knowing that we have five days to cover the material in the chapter.

There are many ways that a week could be laid out; in fact, several ideas are suggested in the Teacher’s Guide. Here’s a look at how my ninth-grade daughter, Kaylee, spends a typical week with All American History.

All American History from Bright Ideas Press

How We Use All American History

Days 1-4

Kaylee spends four days reading through the lesson, filling out the forms and maps that go with the lesson as she reads. Each day she also reads from a book–a biography, non-fiction book, or even an accurately-written historical fiction book–that relates to a person or event covered in the weekly lesson.

Some people might be surprised that I would include fiction as supplemental reading for a high school history course, but I have found that well-researched historical fiction is extremely valuable in helping a student absorb details about the people and events of a particular time period.

All American History from Bright Ideas Press

Day 5

After completing the reading and worksheets, Kaylee spends a day working on the review worksheet included in the Student Activity Book. On this day she also adds important people and events she has studied to her timeline notebook. (The Teacher’s Guide has a very helpful list of things to be included on the timeline.)

New to using timelines? We use these FREE printable timeline notebook pages and History Through the Ages timeline figures.

Free Printable Timeline Notebook Pages

Every 4 weeks

After completing four lessons, Kaylee will have a day to study the material covered during the previous four weeks. The following day she will take a test (from the High School Test Booklet).

Other assignments

Every two weeks or so, Kaylee completes a creative writing assignment related to her history studies. For example, after reading a biography of Harriet Tubman, she wrote a four-paragraph summary of Harriet Tubman’s life. Next she will be writing a letter from a southern plantation lady’s perspective, including details of life in the South during the Civil War.

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